Brassica oleracea.

Kale, broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens… they all pay homage to their ancestor Brassica oleracea[1] Cultivated broadly throughout history, from the plains of Mesopotamia, to the fertile expanses of the Nile, the humble cabbage has stolen the hearts of travelers through history. The root, Oleracea, ties together her children, all the plentiful cultivars of Brassica oleracea.

You might even recognize the lowly cabbage, from it’s minor role in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, a pitiful meal for the entire Bucket’s family, or you might even make note that Diogenes, father of the Cynic philosophy, feasted on this wondrous vegetable. [2]

For me, the cabbage is first and foremost, my favorite dish in the universe. It is the one vegetable that I am never sick of, the meal that I yearn for, a delicious addition to a rather boring utilitarian activity. I will confess that I am not an epicurean, a hedonist of the culinary arts, except for this one vegetable only, the wondrous cabbage.

Of course, it pains me to taste the wretched designs of a chef, who cannot prepare this delicate plant. All too often, the cabbage is boiled to colored slurry, or steamed until the limbs of each leaf are left bare, like a ship’s mast, minus its sail. Cabbage comes in many varieties, just ask Pliny the Elder, all of which are just as unique as the last. [3]

You couldn’t fault the sailors who opted for cabbage, instead of the mouth-puckeringly sour lemons, to prevent and avoid all cases of scurvy, the very same sailors who designed sauerkraut. Cabbage is the lifeblood of many a meal, worthy of recognition as a side-addition or main course.

How cool would it be, (it’d be really cool!) to call yourself lover of cruciferous greens. There’s not much left to say, except that I’m proud, proud of my love for cabbage everyday.

Your friend,

Joseph

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